About five years ago, David Boyden passed down advice from one of his former mentors, saying, “big men generally take longer to develop.” The more we discussed, the more he elaborated on timing, coordination, strength training, and various other variables that went into the growth process. Everything he said was true, yet so many people still expect these big men to be ready for college way ahead of schedule. Sure, guys like Jalen Duren (who was legitimately 6-foot-8 and like 220 pounds in eighth grade) are going to be exceptions to the rule—but those cases are few and far-between. Why does this information matter? Well, it feels like folks simply aren’t high enough on Bobby Cannon. Let’s expound…

It doesn’t seem that long ago when ‘Bobby Cannon’ was merely an intriguing name on MaxPreps from Woodson High School who was among the top freshmen in rebounds and blocked shots. However, his game has grown exponentially since then. Cannon has gone from a pure rim-runner to a true matchup problem. People are quick to point out his lack of strength, but let’s clear up any confusion: Cannon would be recruited by pretty much every school in the country if he were built like Duren or someone of that nature. Why is that worth mentioning? Because it should help the masses understand that 6-foot-10 big men with his skillset and array of tools simply don’t come around very often. Cannon is a mismatch for majority of interior opponents. Sure, some guys are definitely strong enough to make an impact, but he possesses insane length and utilizes it extremely well to combat his lack of raw strength. Add in his mobility, athleticism, perimeter skill, and aforementioned interior ability, and Cannon should definitely be a more coveted prospect. He’s become a knockdown shooter from beyond the arc, but also hits midrange jumpers, turnarounds from the post, and finishes at a nice rate around the basket. Cannon is long enough to extend above the outstretched arms of contesting defenders, specifically as a three-point shooter, and also recognizes when to attack closeouts. His handle has improved to the point of being able to actually make plays off the bounce, which isn’t really a necessity for a big man but it certainly makes him more difficult for opponents to contain. He possesses great timing as a rebounder and rim-protector, and will only become better in those areas with additional strength. 

All in all, Cannon is a well-known name who has continually trended upward throughout the last four years. He currently holds offers from NC A&T, Winthrop, Old Dominion, and East Carolina, but others schools will undoubtedly get involved over the next calendar year. Cannon should have a noteworthy junior season as a main cog for Quality Education Academy, and a big summer season thereafter. Don’t be surprised if Cannon blows up and becomes one of the more enticing prospects in North Carolina’s Class of 2024.