6’3 ’23 Antonio Perkins (Northside Christian)

Given the limited number of seniors on the roster, Perkins’ value should be pretty obvious. He provides a clear veteran presence with the IQ, experience, and leadership qualities to set the tone in a variety of different ways. Perkins is arguably the top shooting threat on the team, but also stands out through being steady, adaptable, and well-rounded. He can initiate, spot-up, and create as needed, yet consistently works within the frame work of the team structure. Furthermore, Perkins rebounded the ball well and defended multiple positions throughout this contest. 

6’8 ’23 Tyson Barrett (Quality Education)

Although the balance was easy to see throughout this squad, Barrett still stands out as a main leader for this group. His blend of size, length, and athleticism allows him to consistently overwhelm opponents on either side of the ball. Barrett is an explosive finisher, but also possesses ability out of the post. He can knock down shots, make solid passes, and outwork others on the glass. Barrett also displays great defensive instincts and knows how to run the floor effectively in transition. 

6’8 ’24 Trentyn Flowers (Combine Academy)

The entire state of North Carolina has been buzzing about the arrival of Flowers, and it’s easy to see why. In terms of raw tools and talent, he is as impressive as any prospect. Flowers is long, smooth, and skilled with the blend of polish and athleticism to naturally cause matchup problems. He shoots the ball at a high level, finishes well around the basket, and makes quality decisions off the bounce. Flowers is already a useful defender and rebounder, but still has undeniable upside remaining in both areas. His lengthy offer sheet is certainly justified. 

6’7 ’23 Steven Lassiter (The Burlington School)

Although there were multiple notable standouts for the Spartans, their lack of true interior pieces made Lassiter’s performance even more remarkable. His shot-making ability will most likely be the top takeaway for most spectators, but folks have to appreciate everything he did as a defender and rebounder. Lassiter finished with consistency, ran the floor in transition, and contained bigger opponents quite well inside the paint. He was a major asset in this contest. 

6’8 ’24 Michael Marcus (Carmel Christian)

There were many standouts for the balanced Cougars in this contest, but Marcus’ steady, low-maintenance identity allowed him to regularly make plays within the flow of the action. He’s big, strong, and utilizes his body well on both ends of the floor. Marcus carves out space well, finishes around the basket, and secures rebounds at a quality rate. He protects the paint effectively and runs the floor properly in transition. 

6’1 ’23 Cannon Keziah (Northwood Temple)

Despite some struggles as a team, Keziah really stepped up to make a lot of plays for Northwood Temple. He’s a knockdown shooter, both off the catch and bounce, who consistently burdened a heavy offensive load throughout this showing. Keziah operated as the primary ball-handler and playmaker, yet still found ways to apply nonstop pressure as a perimeter shooter. In a college setting with more surrounding creators, Keziah could arguably bring even more value to a team.