Team 8
Video Link: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLJSuI1FGChQZIWkCmm1KlmlEtj6Xlsui-

Coach: Kenny Orr

#0: 5’6 ’25 Melvin Farrington (Atlanta)

Starting things off, we look at a player that made a lasting impression despite being the smallest and youngest camper on this team, Melvin Farrington. He’s a smart, fairly well-rounded guard prospect with excellent vision and the ability to pass or finish with either hand. Next in his development process is working on his ability to move without the ball, as it would allow him to coexist alongside another primary ball-handler with relative ease. Coach Orr on Farrington: “Melvin is a very solid guard, especially with the ball in his hands. He is quite crafty/smooth for a player in his class. Melvin shoots it with confidence from midrange and beyond the arc. He has a lot of upside but needs to continue improving on the defensive side of the ball and make a better effort as a rebounder. Melvin also needs to learn how to play without the ball.” Farrington enjoyed an excellent showing at camp, especially for his age, and will be one to watch throughout his continued progression. 

#1: 5’9 ’21 Joshua Mosley (Raleigh)

Next, we look at a player that continually finds ways to stand out with his tough, heady approach, Joshua Mosley. He’s a smart, rugged guard prospect with a nice balance between scoring and playmaking. Mosley does a great job of running a team, both in the half-court and transition, but can also attack the basket or pose a useful spot-up threat. Next in his development process is working on his ability to move without the ball, as it would allow him to coexist alongside another primary ball-handler with relative ease. Coach Orr on Mosley: “Joshua simply makes plays. He can score in bunches in so many different ways. He’s quick off the dribble and plays with so much energy. Joshua need to continue improving his defensive game and moving without the ball in his hands.” Mosely did a lot of things well and was an asset during camp, which should transition nicely into the high school season. 

#2: 5’10 ’24 Carson Daniel (Locust)

Moving onto a player that was quietly among the most impressive young prospects on display, Carson Daniel. He’s a smart, tough, quite advanced two-way floor general with no real weaknesses on either side of the ball. Daniel can attack, shoot, set up others, or find opportunities without the ball, making him adaptable to any collection of teammates. Next in his development process is working on being more disciplined as a defender, rather than gambling for high-risk steals. Coach Orr on Daniel: “Carson plays bigger than his size and accepts all challenges. He was one of the most fundamentally sound players at camp. He can score and facilitate with ease. Carson makes plays on offense and defense, often making the difficult appear easy. He’s always looking for teammates, even when attacking, and can make others better. Carson needs to improve on not taking so many chances on defense.” Daniel was phenomenal throughout camp, averaging 11 PPG, and should be a notable name throughout the foreseeable future. 

#3: 5’11 ’23 Jevon Brown (Florence)

Continuing onto a player with the necessary tools and ability to impact a game in various ways, Jevon Brown. He’s a smart, wiry guard prospect with a ton of offensive ability and the understanding of how to contain his assignment on the other end. Brown can run a team, create for himself or others, or make his presence felt as a spot-up threat or off-ball cutter. Next in his development process is working to add strength to his wiry frame, as it’ll only make him tougher for opponents to contain as a penetrator. Coach Orr on Brown: “Jevon is a talented young player with exceptional playmaking ability. He scores the ball from all three levels, but is arguably at his best when attacking the basket. Jevon is a strong rebounding guard, especially on defense, and can push the break with relative ease. He needs to improve on game speed and not taking plays off.” Brown continues to improve with each viewing and should be poised for a very productive upcoming season at Wilson. 

#4: 6’0 ’22 Luke Brewington (Greensboro)

Next, we look at a player that really stood out with his ability to move without the ball in his hands, Luke Brewington. He’s a smart, unselfish guard prospect that looks to make the right play with unwavering consistency. Brewington is a quality spot-up threat with the ability to attack within two to three dribbles and apply pressure from midrange or beyond the arc. Next in his development process is working to add strength, as it will make him a better penetrator and ball-handler under pressure. Coach Orr on Brewington: “Luke is a heady player that makes all the right plays. When open, he knocks it down. Luke is smart and crafty on the offensive end of the floor. He’s not afraid to attack the basket. Luke needs to improve on getting quicker and improving his overall defensive prowess.” Brewington did a variety of things well during camp and could carve out a role sooner than later for the Bengals.

#5: 6’1 ’24 Santana Lynch (Charlotte)

Moving onto a player that possesses a nice crossroads between production and long-term upside, Santana Lynch. He’s a long, wiry wing prospect with a reliable three-point stroke and overall spot-up presence. Lynch is a great passer with IQ and the ability to score in a variety of different ways. He’s also a quality rebounder with the necessary ball-handling to push the break in transition. Next in his development process is working to improve his defensive prowess, as it would make him a more complete player. Coach Orr on Lynch: “Santana plays with passion. He can be a knockdown shooter when locked in. Santana is a very quiet, low-demeanor player. He utilized his length to create problems for opponents on both ends of the floor. He’s a gifted offensive player. He needs to improve on defense and finishing around the basket.” Lynch highlighted a ton of impressive flashes during camp and has all the tools to develop into a very useful player over the coming years.

#6: 6’1 ’21 Zac Duguid (Charlotte)

Continuing onto a player that solidified himself among the top scorers in attendance, Zac Duguid. He’s a long, wiry guard prospect that showcased the ability to consistently generate quality shots from little to nothing. Duguid possesses the combination of feel and craftiness to pick his spots offensively. He’s also very quick and utilizes his footwork to outwork opponents. Next in his development process is working on improving his overall defensive prowess, as he has the tools to shut down his assignment with more regularity. Coach Orr on Duguid: “Zac is a true scorer. He can score anywhere on the court. He has not seen a shot that he doesn’t like. Zac scores the ball well from all three levels. He has the ability to play above the rim. When he’s on, he is certainly on. Zac is very talented. He needs to improve on passing skills and moving without the ball.” Duguid was undeniably productive during camp, averaging 17 PPG, and could be poised for a breakout senior season. 

#7: 6’3 ’22 Dylan Wheatley (Greensboro)

Next, we look at a player that was arguably the main glue-guy of this team throughout camp, Dylan Wheatley. He’s a smart, wiry, high-motor wing prospect with an excellent perimeter jumper and passing vision. Wheatley scored the ball in a strong variety of ways while consistently looking to make the best/smartest available play. Next in his development process is working on his transition defense, as it would make him a more complete player. Coach Orr on Wheatley: “Dylan plays bigger than his listed height. He can do it all. He’s a smart, jack-of-all-trades player. Dylan knocks down shots, attacks the basket, and simply makes plays. He rebounds at a high clip on both ends of the floor and has a nonstop motor. Dylan is a total team player. He needs to become more aggressive as an offensive player because he has the ability.” Wheatley certainly proved to be an asset at camp, averaging 10 PPG, and will be one to watch closely over these next few years.

#8: 6’4 ’23 Devin Keasey (Newport News)

Moving onto a player that really embraced his role as one of the main interior prospects on this team, Devin Keasey. He’s a big, strong-bodied post prospect with a great motor and the ability to carry his rebounding weight on both ends of the floor. Keasey can knock down perimeter jumpers at a solid clip or battle around the basket for second-chance opportunities. Next in his development process is working on his ability to move without the ball, as it would allow him to find more scoring opportunities as an off-ball cutter. Coach Orr on Keasey: “Devin can be a ball-handler. He rebounds the ball very well on both ends of the floor. He’s an unselfish player that thinks of his team first. He has three-point shooting range and has a ton of room to grow, being that he’s only a sophomore. Devin needs to improve on getting quicker and finishing around the basket.” Keasey did a lot of things well at camp, averaging 10 PPG, and should be a name worth noting for the future. 

#9: 6’5 ’21 Darren Jackson (Chesterfield)

Finishing up, we look at a player that still has a clear amount of long-term upside remaining, Darren Jackson. He’s a long, wiry forward/post prospect with a high motor and a lot of physical tools. Jackson moves well for his size and looks to alter shots as often as possible. He runs the floor well in transition and can knock down perimeter jumpers at a solid clip. Next in his development process is working on moving without the ball, as it would lead to an improved amount of scoring chances as an off-ball cutter. Coach Orr on Jackson: “Darren is long and athletic. He jumps out of the gym. He creates problems with his length. He shoots the ball efficiently whenever he looks to access jumpers. He’s a team player and top-notch help defender by blocking shots. He needs to improve on moving without the ball and finishing in traffic. Darren must get stronger.” Jackson displayed a lot of tools during camp and should be able to carve out a pretty productive role during his upcoming senior season.