Team 2

Coach: Rick Lewis

#4: 4’9 ’27 Dylan Brown (Charlotte)

Starting things off, we look at a player that found a way to make his presence felt despite being among the youngest and smallest performers on display, Dylan Brown. He’s a young, hardworking guard prospect that displayed solid perimeter shooting and the ability to make the right pass to open teammates. Brown hustled for loose balls, worked within the team concept, didn’t force the action, and made plays whenever possible on both ends of the floor. Next in his development process is working to get stronger, as it will allow him to be more impactful with older/bigger competition. Coach Lewis on Brown: “Dylan was one of the youngest players at camp. He has a solid attitude, fundamentals, and understands the game. He just needs to get stronger and continue developing.” Brown worked hard during his time at camp and should continue working to maximize his skillset over the coming years. 

#12: 5’4 ’24 Reece Bradshaw (Clinton)

Next, we look at a player that showed a willingness to do whatever possible to give his team an edge, Reece Bradshaw. He’s a wiry guard prospect that understands how to operate within the team concept and maximize his touches on offense. Bradshaw played with great effort defensively, ran the floor hard in transition, and knocked down multiple perimeter jumpers on the day. He moves well without the ball and works to make his presence felt on the glass. Next in his development process is working to become a better ball-handler, as it would open up his offensive game tremendously. Coach Lewis on Bradshaw: “Reece has good IQ and fundamentals. He plays his role and is a good team player. He never forces shots, plays hard, and knows his spots on the floor.” Bradshaw worked hard during his time at camp and should continue working to maximize his skillset. 

#15: 5’5 ’27 Seth Harris (Greensboro)

Moving onto a player that displayed a pretty useful array of tools despite being among the youngest performers in attendance, Seth Harris. He’s a young, energetic guard prospect that can do a little bit of everything while operating within the team concept on both ends of the floor. Harris works hard and fights on the glass whenever possible but can also knock down the open jumper with solid consistency. Next in his development process is working on his overall defensive intensity, as it would make him a more complete player. Coach Lewis on Harris: “Seth has a great attitude and was a great team player throughout camp. He listens extremely well, just needs to have more confidence—which will come with continued growth and development. Seth played his role and did what was asked.” Harris proved to be a quality teammate and contributor during camp, so it’ll be exciting to see his continued growth going forward. 

#23: 5’8 ’24 Asher Brown (Brasstown)

Continuing onto a player that was quietly among the top two-way guards in attendance, Asher Brown. He’s a smart, energetic, strong-bodied guard prospect that understands how to offer a proper balance between scoring and playmaking. Brown is pretty crafty and gets by defenders quite often, where he’s able to consistently make plays within the paint. He defends and rebounds at a quality rate for his position and always looks to make the best possible play. Next in his development process is working on the use of his off-hand, as it would make him a more complete player. Coach Lewis on Brown: “Asher plays extremely hard. He’s best when going downhill, where he aggressively drives to the rim—I really like his ability to play on both ends of the court. He has a good attitude, is a hard worker, and gives good energy. Asher is a willing listener that is eager to learn.” Brown was among the most productive players on his team during camp and will be a prospect worth keeping an eye on going forward. 

#28: 5’9 ’24 Tyler Sandaire (Clayton)

Next, we look at a player that really stood out with his motor and ability to make plays within the flow of the team, Tyler Sandaire. He’s a wiry, scrappy guard prospect that works hard on both ends of the floor to make his presence felt. Sandaire is great at getting downhill and attacking the basket but can also knock down open jumpers from the perimeter. He defends and rebounds well for his size/position, and knows how to make the proper pass when penetrating. Next in his development process is working to add strength, as it’ll make him an even better finisher through contact. Coach Lewis on Sandaire: “Tyler showed flashes on both ends of the court. He has solid court vision and is a willing passer. At times, Tyler stepped up defensively and made stops or forced turnovers. He attacked the basket and scored going downhill.” Sandaire proved to be a difference-maker for his team during camp and could ultimately emerge as a solid contributor at the high school level. 

#45: 6’0 ’24 Bryan Sellars (Winston-Salem)

Moving onto a player that was quietly among the most intense, dynamic two-way performers on display, Bryan Sellars. He’s a long, athletic, fairly versatile wing prospect with a nice motor and the ability to consistently impact the game on either side of the ball. Sellars defended multiple positions, forced turnovers, made plays in transition, and was able to attack the basket whenever he desired. He possesses a great frame, quality IQ, nose for the ball and a skillset that will only continue to add polish going forward. Next in his development process is working on adding a reliable three-point shot to his arsenal, as it would make him incredibly difficult to contain on offense. Coach Lewis on Sellars: “Bryan has good length and athleticism. He’s an above-average rebounder that is active but needs to improve on his boxing-out technique. He runs the floor and has good anticipation for loose balls and rebounds. Bryan needs to play harder and with more urgency.” Sellars is definitely a name worth noting after his showing at camp, and it’ll be exciting to track his progression going forward. 

#48: 6’1 ’24 Landen Pearson (Clinton)

Next, we look at a player that highlighted a pretty intriguing skillset and overall approach to the game, Landen Pearson. He’s a long, wiry, fairly skilled forward prospect that can play inside or out on offense while defending multiple positions on the other end. Pearson can face-up, operate out of the post, take slower opponents off the dribble, or cut without the ball. He’s a quality rebounder and nice passer for his size. Next in his development process is working to tighten up his handle, as it would make him a more dynamic offensive threat. Coach Lewis on Pearson: “Landen has good IQ and fundamentals. He displays a good knowledge of the game with a solid all-around skillset. He does a lot of the little things well. Landen has good size and good upside. He needs to play harder, box-out, and run back consistently on defense.” Pearson showcased great tools and was productive throughout camp, so it’ll be interesting to see his development going forward. 

#55: 6’4 ’24 Jahseem Felton (Charlotte)

Finishing up, we look at a player that was easily among the most dominant all-around performers on display, Jahseem Felton. He’s a long, strong, athletic guard prospect with high IQ and a pretty well-rounded skillset, especially for his age and advanced frame. Felton is almost unstoppable at getting where he wants to go, particularly on penetration attempts, and finishes at an extremely high rate anywhere inside the arc. Next in his development process is working on his three-point consistency, as it would take him to an even higher level as a national prospect. Coach Lewis on Felton: “Jahseem was one of the top players in camp. The “do it all” player has the tools. He can turn on at a switch. He does need to learn how to move better without the ball but is a very unselfish player. Jahseem can be as good as he wishes to be. He can handle, pass, rebound, and score. He’s balanced beyond his years.” Felton was undeniably impressive throughout camp, securing the MVP award with relative ease, and should have the attention of Division I coaches for the foreseeable future.