Being overlooked has become a commonality within the grassroots community, especially since the start of covid nearly two years ago. It doesn’t even seem to matter if you play for a talent-laden roster and college coaches are constantly filtering through the building, offers are simply being distributed at an incredibly low rate. Think about Northwood High School, for example. They have plenty of Division I coaches showing up for Drake Powell (who holds offers from NC State, Cincinnati, Appalachian State, VCU, Miami, Virginia Tech, Texas A&M, LSU, Wake Forest, Tennessee, and South Florida), yet Max Frazier and Kenan Parrish haven’t received any scholarships at that level. Given everything we’ve seen from the frontcourt duo, both with Northwood and the Durham Hurricanes, it’s easy to see them succeeding in a ton of different situations. Let’s look at each…

In looking at Frazier, his long, wiry 6-foot-8 frame is the first thing to stand out to most spectators. Although somewhat skinny, he possesses toughness, fluidity, athleticism, and the necessary strength to make his presence felt on both ends of the floor. Frazier displays sharp instincts and moves really well for his size, which already makes him a problem for most opponents as a defender and shot-altering piece. He finishes well around the basket, highlighting touch and explosion, but can also step out and knock down perimeter jumpers at a respectable rate. Frazier plays hard, involves himself in the rebounding battle, and runs the floor properly in transition. If this were before covid, he would almost certainly hold a handful of Division I offers. However, kudos to Catawba for being his only offer. Frazier should only get better with continued strength development. 

On the other side, Parrish is a big, strong 6-foot-10 post prospect with a sturdy frame and legitimate size as an interior cog. He’s massive, but mobile enough to outwork and outproduce his assignment on both ends of the floor. Parrish possesses nice touch around the basket and shoots the ball at a quality percentage (especially for his size/position), yet doesn’t necessarily require a ton of touches to find success. He does a great job of controlling the glass, walling-up defensively, running the floor in transition, and capitalizing as needed offensively. Parrish knows his identity very well, and would likely have a lot of offers in a normal year (like his teammate above). That being said, Parrish is still someone who should be recruited by various Division I programs. Expect this duo to continue turning heads over the coming months.