6’3 ’19 Jett Fortuny (WCBA)
There’s not much more to say about the WCBA sharpshooter. It seems like this program adds
and nurtures a new prospect every year, from guys like Connor Crabtree and Colton Reed to
Patrick Dorsey and Ryan Shaffer, and now Jett Fortuny. His name falls nicely in place beside the
others, who all seem to have a similar WCBA gene. Fortuny’s play-style is quite fun to watch,
but it’s also incredibly effective. It would be difficult to recollect an instance when Fortuny
didn’t finish the game with at least one made three-pointer, because he just never goes that awry.
That is arguably what separates Fortuny from other shooters, his consistency. Too often, we see
guys labeled as “shooters,” but they’re unable to maintain a certain level of accuracy, resulting in
streakiness. Not Fortuny, he’s simply too efficient with his touches to be lumped in with other
streaky prospects. That being said, the off-guard should receive some Division I looks, as his
shooting could benefit a wide variety of programs.

6’10 ’19 Sallou Diop (Team Loaded CVA)
One could argue that this Team Loaded CVA squad was the most intriguing team on display
from Wednesday to Sunday, but a lot of that intrigue was centered around Sallou Diop. The big
man has tantalizing length and seems to just be scratching the surface of his defensive abilities.
However, Diop already looks quite comfortable utilizing his length to alter and block shots
around the rim. Adding lower body strength would make him a truly interesting defensive
presence, especially given his natural instincts around the basket. Diop lacks an identity on
offense, but there are plenty of reasons to believe that he could add a formidable scoring avenue,
whether from midrange or the low-post, and start applying pressure on both ends of the floor.

5’7 ’19 John Caraig (Combine Academy)
The Combine Academy squad didn’t enjoy their strongest showing this week, but John Caraig
was a massive bright spot for this team. The point guard doesn’t appear physically imposing,
which means Caraig was forced to use his intelligence and craftiness to generate offense for the
entire team. He’s a pretty strong ball-handler and passer, but he also displayed the ability to score
when needed. Caraig is a decent shooter, but he mostly relies on runners, floaters, and in-
between shots after beating his initial assignment off the dribble. His week was difficult, because
he lacked true offensive weapons and, as a true point guard, it is nearly impossible to make
things run without coinciding pieces. However, Caraig showcased a lot of translatable skills. If
he can continue to develop his jump shot and overall physique, then he would certainly be a
college-level player.

6’3 ’19 Fred Cobb (PSB-Winston)
Various guys receive the bulk of the credit on this PSB-Winston team, but it feels like Fred Cobb
deserves a little more than he currently receives. He truly is the glue-guy of this team and doesn’t
have to score a lot to make his presence felt, though he typically does make a mark on offense.
Cobb possesses a solid wingspan to go with his active motor, which makes life especially
difficult for opponents in transition. He stretches the floor, but also has the ability to create his
own offense or rip-through and get to the rim off the catch. Cobb’s most underrated attribute is
his sneaky-athleticism. The wing prospect isn’t going to go chest-to-chest at the rim, but he’s
shown the tendency to challenge any opponent around the basket. Though he may be the
flashiest guy on the squad, college coaches should give a hard look to Cobb.

6’1 ’20 Sean McCabe (Columbia Hoyas)
Lastly, we look at a player that certainly has a chance to find himself on the Division I landscape
with continued development, Sean McCabe. Over the past year, the combo-guard has elevated
his game in nearly every facet while adding strength and sharpening his mind for the game. He’s
quietly gone from a shooter to a true scorer with the ability to consistently initiate offense for the
team. This Columbia Hoyas team looked to McCabe to score more than anyone else on a game-
to-game basis, and he upheld his end of the bargain quite well. He has a strong IQ and overall
feel for the game, but it’s likely that he’ll just keep improving, especially given what we’ve seen
over the last few months.