Given everything with covid and general restrictions over the last year, the recruiting landscape in Division I basketball has arguably become more brutal than ever before. Receiving an offer is starting to become a rarity unless a player is nationally ranked or pursued by other programs of the same (or higher) levels. In less than twelve months, Cade Tyson went from a standstill in recruitment (holding zero offers) to announcing his decision to commit to Belmont over the likes of Charlotte, Mercer, UNCW, Western Carolina, Coastal Carolina, and Radford. While it is a perfect fit at an excellent level, it’s important to remember Tyson’s journey. Let’s take a closer look…

Originally at Piedmont High School, Tyson followed in a similar pathway to his older brother (Hunter, who currently plays for Clemson). Although the duo never joined forces, both guys found their own individual success. In all honesty, one could pose the argument that Cade was more dominant than his brother during their respective time with the Panthers. He posted massive scoring totals and consistently produced on a nightly basis throughout his first two seasons at the school. He also hit an unforeseen growth spurt in the midst of his high school career, and subsequently became even more appealing to college coaches. Soon thereafter, Tyson would opt to make his move to the private school ranks by joining Carmel Christian. 

Given the seamless transition on the court, his lack of offers (at the time) quickly became unexplainable. This immediately changed, as Tyson steadily became a priority for various types of programs. Despite his aforementioned offers, one could still claim that Tyson is talented enough to warrant attention from high-major schools. However, there are plenty of reasons why Belmont offered and received his commitment all within a one-week turnaround. The fit is nearly ideal for both sides. Between his size, perimeter shooting, and ability to thrive within a low-maintenance role, Tyson should have no issue emerging as a contributor over the coming years. Add in his continued upside (both physically and in terms of skill), and this seems like a perfect marriage. Expect the 6-foot-7 wing prospect to be an asset for the Bruins.